Work Safety

Commonly Used Welding Codes: A Quick Guide

By November 26, 2020April 15th, 2022No Comments
Updated: April 04, 2022
A welding code is a set of guidelines developed by the Welding Codes Council to ensure safety in metal-welding practices. These codes are meant to help welders and those around them know what they should do when working on different metals like aluminum or stainless steel. If you’re in charge of a job site, it is important for you to know your codes so that you can make sure everything is being done safely! The following article outlines the most common welding codes. This post will discuss some commonly used welding codes and what they mean for those who do the work on the job site.

Purpose of a welding code

The purpose of a welding code is to make sure that welders and those around them know what safety precautions they should be taking when dealing with different metals. Welding codes are important because they keep welders safe and help them create better work. They also ensure that the welding is done in a way that’s pleasing to the eye, which makes it more aesthetically pleasing as well!

Welding code systems

There are many different kinds of welding code systems , so it can be difficult to know what you need. However, many of the codes that are most commonly used in welding are:

  • American Petroleum Institute (API) codes
  • American Welding Society (AWS) codes
  • American Society Of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes
  • American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) codes
  • International Organization for Standardization (ISO) codes
  • National Fire Protection Association standards (NFPA)

These welding code systems each have their own set of rules and regulations that must be followed, so make sure you know which ones to use. For example, most t-code regulations are closely followed in the United States, but ISO codes have more weight internationally.

American Petroleum Institute (API) codes

The American Petroleum Institute, named for the industry it serves, is an international organization that develops standards and provides technical advice in order to promote safety, reliability and environmental protection.

Common API codes

  • API 510- Process Piping, Welding and Related Activities
  • API 570 – Welded Steel Pipe for Offshore Use
  • API 1130 – Specification for Rigid Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) Plastic Tubing Used in Wellhead Equipment
  • API 1243 – Guide to the Selection of Coating Materials for use on Welding Electrodes
  • API RP 100 – Recommended Practice for Welding Pipelines and Related Facilities
  • API 1278 – Specification for Carbon Steel Pipes Used in Offshore Oil and Gas Production
  • API 1604 – Pipeline Crossing of Public Roadways Made by Existing Ductile Iron Pipe In Place with Concrete Collar on the Outside

American Society Of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes

These are a set of codes based on principles in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. They are designed to protect engineers from the hazards of working with dangerous materials and equipment.

Common ASME codes

  • ASME B16.11 – Seamless Carbon Steel Pipe Flanges and Flanged Fittings, Class 150 , 300, 600
  • ASME B31.0 – Cast Iron Threaded Pipe Flanges and Flanged Fittings for High-Pressure Service
  • ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code Sec I Div III Part XI (Sec IX) Piping Systems: General Rules Concerning Design, Construction or Operation and Maintenance of Pipelines, Pipe Supports and Piping Fittings
  • ASME B16.28 – Seamless Stainless Steel Pipe Flanges and Flanged Fittings, Class 125 , 250, 400
  • ASME Sec V Gas Pipelines: General Rules Concerning Design, Construction or Operation and Maintenance of Lines and Their Appurtenances
  • ASME Sec VI Gas Transmission and Distribution Pipelines: General Rules Concerning Design, Construction or Operation and Maintenance of Lines and Their Appurtenances
  • ASME Sec VII Gas Storage Pipelines: General Rules Concerning Design, Construction or Operation and Maintenance of Lines and Their Appurtenances.

American Welding Society (AWS) codes

Many of the welding codes that are most commonly used in the United States are AWS codes. The American Welding Society was created to help develop standards for all areas of welding and equipment, including safety, qualification requirements, testing procedures and documentation practices.

Common AWS codes

  • AWS D1.1 -2009 is a code that pertains to welding of high-strength steels and alloys, with or without concern for distortion.
  • AWS D11 .DIN-2002 codes are the guidelines for designing pressure vessels which include manufacturing processes like stamping or bending stainless steel plate by mechanical means.
  • AWS D1.2 .DIN-1987 is a code that pertains to welding of wrought materials like carbon steel.
  • AWS B11.02 is a code that has to do with welding pipes and fittings, including hydrostatic testing procedures for all pipe sizes up to 12 inches in diameter.
  • AWS D01 .DBSR-2009 codes are the guidelines for designing pressure vessels which include manufacturing processes like stamping or bending stainless steel plate by mechanical means.
  • AWS D01.DIN-2009 codes are the guidelines for designing pressure vessels which include manufacturing processes like stamping or bending stainless steel plate by mechanical means.
  • AWS E19 .BTLR-2002 is a code that pertains to welding of titanium, nickel alloys and other special metals with low melting points.
  • AWS E19.AWS-2002 is a code that pertains to welding of titanium, nickel alloys and other special metals with low melting points.

American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) code systems

Another popular set of welding codes are ASTM code systems. The American Society of Testing and Materials was founded in 1898 with the goal to develop standards for materials, products, services and processes or environmental subjects so that they could be used consistently throughout industry.

Common ASTM codes

  • ASTM A519/A519M – Specification for General Requirements of Rolled Stainless Steel Sheet, Strip and Plate
  • ASTMD1238- Standard Test Method for Constant Load Strength in Tension Testing or Rolling Force on a Tube or Pipe From Which the Material is Drawn by Extrusion to and quality
  • ASTMD1417- Standard Specification for General Requirements of Welded Steel Pipe Having Greater Wall Thickness
  • ASTMD1418- Standard Specification for General Requirements of Heat Treated Austenitic Stainless Steels in the Annealed Condition

International Organization for Standardization (ISO) codes

These welding code systems address all aspects of safety in a wide variety of industries, including marine, construction, mechanical engineering and manufacturing. The first ISO code system is the ISO/AWS DIN Standard. This standard was created by representatives from Germany and Austria in 1946 to address issues with weldability of stainless steel. It has been revised six times, most recently in 2003.

Common ISO codes

  • ISO 15156 – Selection and Use of Coatings on Electrical Insulating Materials, Part I: General Requirements
  • ISO 2500 – Steel Sheet, Strip and Plate for Welding
  • ISO/TS 16949 Quality Management Systems-Requirements for Automotive Suppliers.

National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) codes

The National Fire Protection Association was established by a group of insurance companies as well as fire departments throughout the United States in 1896.

Common NFPA codes

  • NFPA 54 – Standard for the Installation of Stationary Combustion Engines and Gas Turbines
  • NFPA 70 – National Electric Code

These are the common NFPA codes, as well as SJI’s (safety joint inspection programs). The most important thing to note is that a company who has not had an annual safety inspection might be in violation of these laws.

Derrick Irvyn

Derrick Irvyn

A passionate researcher and marketing manager. He made hundreds of reviews on various safety products for the last decade. He is fond of blogging and also likes to hear from the curious people about their experiences and opinions. Derick had a lot of expertise and knowledge, but did not have a lot of experience in writing, although this was something he had longed to do. The opportunity to join the team at DefenseHacks was a dream come true of sorts, as he not only could share his insights with us, but with the world as a whole.

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